The basic self is relative to the brain, thus without egoistic intentions

Updated May 17, 2022

What you believe in being does not control the events in a dream where you appear to be, nor are you in it. You are in your bed. Likewise, you are not in a world where there seems to be more than one. Nor are you anywhere else because it takes more than one to be somewhere, and there is no more than oneness since it is formless and therefore endless. Nevertheless, while you believe to be someone in a fantasy world where there seems to be more than one trying to control, it feels frustrating, whereas going with its flow makes you feel good. Photo © Alexius Jorgensen.

In a computer game, the game’s creator has designed what and where you appear to be. You cannot change that, but you can perceive it in a way that is in sync with the plot or not. The latter is frustrating and the former entertaining. The same applies to the tangible world where you appear to be someone substantial. What and where you seem to be is a fiction made by the brain, and it cannot be changed – only your interpretation of it.

If that is in sync with the brain’s script, you feel entertained by the idea of being someone substantial in a tangible world. It feels a bit like going up and down on a rollercoaster. You scream of fear when going down and shout of joy when going up. And it is equally entertaining because everything comes in pairs in the brain’s script.

But this is not the way the special self sees it. Its fundamental instinct is to perceive everything divided into right and wrong. And since going down is deemed wrong, this is not an experience it sees as equally entertaining as going up. Actually, the special self never really enjoys any experience because it is busy figuring out how to feel the next one.

And though it never works out as planned, it insists that everything is going to get better. On the other hand, the basic self has nothing to make better because it does not separate right from wrong.

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The special self only talks about feelings speculatively like ‘do I really love this person?’

But it does not love anybody because to uphold its perception of being in control, it avoids feelings of intimacy by being with people who collectively have agreed to focus on the energy of emotions and not their emotional impact.

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The idea of keeping an open mind excites the special self because it seems to confirm the belief that it is possible to be and have more than that which is One. Photo © Alexius Jorgensen.

Since feelings tend to mess up the perception that the special self has made of itself as an independent and unique being, it wants to keep them at a distance. But as this collides with its need to show off as an open person, it lays the blame for fencing off feelings on its spouse, for example, who it criticises for being closed, thus making it impossible for the special self to express its feelings.

This perceived unapproachableness of others is a favourite topic of the special self. And although its feelings are unrecognised, it shows off as an expert on others’ feelings. But what it sees in others is its own suppressed feelings (read more about that here).

The basic self, on the other hand, always knows what it feels because it is reproduced in the world of duality produced by the brain outside of it. Or maybe it is the other way around. The basic self could not care less because inside and outside define each other.

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The special self is all about survival, whereas the basic self is all about serving.

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When events seem to be going in the favour of the special self, it states that it is free from the brain, thus doing everything in its own way. But when it fails, the special self blames the brain.

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If one of the special self’s perceptions are exposed as fake, the special self diverts the focus from itself by making up a new perception in which it is unjustly attacked.

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The special self likes to be together with others, but on one condition, namely that others accept its perception of things so it shapes their relationship.

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The basic self has no need to edit the experience of the world into something that complies with special concepts of being together in harmony, balance or whatnot. On the contrary, everything it experiences is created by the brain, so it is together with everything, no matter the appearance. Photo © Alexius Jorgensen.

By stating ‘we all are one,’ the special self thinks it expresses spirituality. And it might deceive those who, like itself, believe in separation because this statement is founded on that belief. Hence it is not spirituality but separation, the special self wants to enhance when it says ‘we are all one.’

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The special self expects to be more appreciated when recognised as positive. Thus it always excludes what it judges as unfavourable from its appearance. However, it is not positivity but exclusivity that the special self is adored for because exclusion ratifies separation, thus the belief in being important.

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When you perceive yourself not to be basic but special, you constantly look for somebody to manipulate into ratifying your significance (read more about that here). That is why you always need to meet others and have a calendar full of appointments.

But as closeness may reveal the misery behind your story of greatness, you prefer to follow the conventional rules of being together. For example, a traditional dinner party is set up, so you appear to be together. But if you adjust to the table manners, you do not risk being close to anybody.

The basic self, on the other hand, has no need to be acknowledged as unique. Hence it does not try to fit into the collectively agreed concepts of how to be together, nor does it use these concepts to manipulate others to do and say something that attests to its significance. It has no need to be important or something else other than being a tool for the brain.

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The special self expects others not to question its story of greatness but to adapt to it so they appear ordinary and the special self to be original. That is its way to hide it feels inferior.

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The special self is always trying to escape something, but it does not know what. Neither will it ever know because there is nothing to escape. It is an illusion that only seems real because it always looks for something to exclude, so it can appear more unique. Photo © Alexius Jorgensen.

When the brain decides you must have a cake and you fight it for ideological reasons but, eventually, have a cake, you say it was your choice to give in. In this way, you fool yourself into thinking, you do things in your own way and tempo of motion.

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Having one’s perception in sync with the stream of thoughts from the brain feels like being wholly absorbed by a TV show after having binge-watched it.

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Watching a TV show, the brain is in its right element, continually passes remarks and predicts what comes next. When not doubting or altering these comments but going with them, you are also in your right element, namely to be a follower of the brain. However, since the brain contains the sum of your most significant memories, and that is what you believe to be, you are not just a follower but a leader as well.

But not following the brain, you are neither servant nor master but always look for something special to follow to make you feel in your right element. Or maybe you imagine a specific school of thought will help you peel off the layers that you assume prevent you from being in your right element. But no matter what you believe in becoming, it only seems so because thoughts, like a binary code of nothing, are put together in a perception of yourself that appears to manifest that.

This is not to say that following the brain is more real. Every experience is make-believe – just like in a role-play. However, following the instructions of the game master can be pretty fun. Likewise, believing to be someone in a world defined by time and space is quite entertaining when you do not try to add or subtract something from the instructions you get from the brain.

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You can compare the basic self to a cat. It does not plan to do Pilates at a specific hour but, naturally, stretches out when its biological system tells it to do so. Nor does it attend special seminars to learn who it is or how to be transformed into something else. There is no ‘I’ with a need to be anything but a cat.

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If you do not make up a perception that avoids, corrects or replace the brain’s script, you confirm that you miss nothing and that the brain supplies you with everything needed. Thus you feel safe. Photo © Alexius Jorgensen.

Nothing in a dream can be changed by the dreamer except the perception of it. So though you are not in charge of the events, you decide to perceive specific ones as frightening. Thus fear becomes sticky and not just a fleeting feeling. Likewise, when you insist on being someone substantial in a tangible world.

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If you often feel irritated or confused, you are not in sync with the brain’s script because all of its feelings are fleeting, and their lightness entails happiness. In other words, if irritation is sticky, you have chosen to be independent of the brain, and being on your own does not feel good.

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Within the apparent materialisation of a world defined by time and space, your most defining experiences of being someone are stored in the brain. And as they constitute what you believe to be (read more about that here), you cannot have this belief undone without honouring the brain.

So although the experiences fabricated and stored in the brain are made from nothing, you should not dismiss them as something because they ratify the choice you seem to have made to establish you as someone in a world defined by time and space. And if not honouring your choice, it cannot be undone.

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As it takes more than one to experience something, the brain needs to render a world where there seems to be more than one, so the self it has created can experience being someone. There is not something deeper or spiritual to learn or attain for the self because it is make-believe – including that there is a brain and something beyond it.

Since the basic self does not perceive itself to be different from the brain, and since everything it experiences to be, see, think and feel is made by the brain, the basic self does not belong to anyone but everyone.

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What you believe in being is based on memories stored in the brain. The experience of something coming from somewhere else is created by it. So there is nothing to serve other than the brain.

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Most try to see a specific self behind their different approaches to the world. Yet, there is no other self than the basic one created by the brain. It is without a centre and ever-changing with the fleeting experiences the brain develops. That is why you are bound to feel unfulfilled when you try to define yourself in a definite way. On the other hand, you always feel fulfilled if defined by the fleeting experiences produced by the brain. In this flexibility of relativism, any experience generated by the brain amuses you, regardless of what and where you appear to be.

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You do not enter the stress of being someone definitive when you perceive your response to an experience as ‘it is what it is.  Instead, you remain without a centre and focus. Thus you automatically play the role set up by the brain for the present moment. Photo © Alexius Jorgensen.

Within the context of believing to be someone in a world where there seems to be more than one, you do not have a definitive self but one that is relative to the fleeting experiences produced by the brain. And since the brain makes sure your response to the experiences is perceived as ‘it is what it is,’ you feel satisfied by all of them. Read more about this perception in hack #4.2 The brain’s script and how to perceive it to feel happy.

That is if you do not override this basic perception with I know what it is.’  In that case, you get frustrated because things do not work out according to your ideas but the brain’s script. Although you can choose between going right or left, for example, the brain decides your decision’s subsequent events – just like in a computer game, where every outcome of your choices is prefixed. Or like a flight to New York continues as planned, regardless of your whereabouts on the plane.

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If one’s perception is in sync with the flow of thoughts from the brain, experiences seem relative. Not being in sync with the flow, they appear definitive. The former results in feeling free and the latter in feeling imprisoned.

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The basic self is not a definitive entity but relative to the brain and, therefore, without egoistic drive. The special self is also relative to the brain but not without an egoistic drive because contrary to the basic self, it perceives the thoughts coming from the brain as if it is in charge of them and, consequently, itself.

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Being in tune with the present experience created by the brain, the basic self does not perceive itself as definitive but relative to that. But since the special self believe it handles everything in its own way, it perceives itself as being definitive. It is a wonder, though, how it can go on believing being that when it does not know who it is.

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Within the context of a world where there seems to be more than one, the basic self is everyone and no one. As the basic self is relative, there is no self to doubt. The special self, on the other hand, always doubts itself because it insists on being someone definitive.

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If the special self perceives somebody to be stupid, it is most likely meant to condemn them. But when the basic self makes the same perception, it is not to blame somebody but to fend off a relationship that the brain instructs you to avoid. In other words, the basic self respects the signals of the brain. Photo © Alexius Jorgensen.

For the special self, it is always about what others could have done to make it happy. On the other hand, the basic self never gets disappointed by somebody because they are not the ones making it happy. The brain is. It always rewards the basic self with happiness for perceiving its experiences as they are and not as they could be, Thus the basic self has no reason to be disappointed.

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The special self is an expert in flattery, which it uses to manipulate others into feeling appreciated. It wants them to become so dependent on the compliments that they are willing to submit to the special self to get more.

However, this does not work on the basic self. It has no need for approval because it does not perceive itself as definitive but relative to the way the brain renders the present moment.

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The self is created by the brain, and it cannot be changed by you. But that does not mean it is definitive. It is relative to the present experiences created by the brain. »The brain is constantly reconfiguring every second of your life. Even by the time you get to the end of this paragraph, you’ll be a slightly different person than you were at the beginning.« David Eagleman, an American neuroscientist, in The working of the brain resembles drug dealers in Albuquerque.

That is why the more you read Alexius’ Duality Hacks, the more they apply themselves.


NOTE: This article is part of hack #4.1 The basic self versus the special one.